water saving landscape

Do you have a water saving landscape?
7 ways to reduce water use on your lawn and landscaping.

WE PARTNERED WITH ZORO.COM TO BRING YOU A 10 MINUTE GUIDE TO SAVE WATER IN YOUR YARD THIS SUMMER! HERE IS AN EXCERPT FROM THE COMPREHENSIVE ARTICLE.


About 30% of daily water use by the average American is devoted to outdoors, on lawns and landscaping. In dry climates, it can jump as high as 60%. That’s more than 8.5 billion gallons per day!

We asked landscape design experts Becca LaBarre and Carol Arand from Chicagoland’s EverGreen Landcape Associates how to cut back water waste. Here are their insider tips for reducing water use outdoors.

1. GROW NATIVE AND LOCAL PLANTS

Native plants are already adapted and live comfortably in the sun and water that’s available in your area. Once established, native and low water-using plants require little water beyond normal rainfall.

“Each plant within their own locale has adapted to their circumstance, which helps with their drought tolerance,” says Arand. Read More About Native Plans >>

2. MULCH MUCH?

Not only is mulch good for making an attractive landscape, but it also has many other benefits.

  • Reduces weed growth
  • Keeps soil and roots cool
  • Prevents water evaporation
  • Retains water for plants and soil
  • Can improve soil condition as it decomposes

“You don’t necessarily need premium mulch,” says LaBarre. “We recommend a mulch that has some bark fibers in it. The bark fibers tend to breakdown slower and not blow away as quickly as mulches heavily composed of wood chips.”

“Some combination of wood chips is OK to save money,” LeBarre adds. “But we do not recommend dyed mulch products.” Read More About Mulch Tips >>

3. PLANT TREES FOR SHADE

“Trees add shade, cooling, comfort, for plants as well as people,” says Arand.

More shade means less water evaporation and less water needed to keep plants thriving. They are a great way to create a water saving landscape. Most trees actually prefer less water and are fairly drought-tolerant. In the Midwest, for example, maples, elms, and honey locusts grow quickly and are hearty. Read More About Tree Shade >>


The 10 Minute Guide To Saving Water

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